Volume Editors

singley

Carol Singley, General Editor of the Complete Works of Edith Wharton

Volume 12: Ethan Frome

Carol J. Singley (Ph.D. Brown University, M.A., B.A. Pennsylvania State University) is a Professor of English and a Fellow at the Center for Children and Childhood Studies. She directs the Undergraduate Liberal Studies Program and co-directs the American Studies Program, which includes an option for interdisciplinary studies of Walt Whitman. She serves on the board of the Walt Whitman Association, which helps to support historic preservation, education, and tourism at Whitman’s home in Camden. She formerly directed the Women’s Studies Program. She is the recipient of grants and fellowships from the New Jersey Council on the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the American Antiquarian Association, and the Center for Critical Analysis of Contemporary Culture.

A scholar of Edith Wharton, Carol Singley is author of a book about religion in Wharton’s fiction, Edith Wharton: Matters of Mind and Spirit (Cambridge University Press, 1995) and editor of three volumes on Wharton: a New Riverside Edition of The Age of Innocence (2001), the Oxford Historical Guide to Edith Wharton (Oxford University Press, 2003) and The House of Mirth Casebook (Oxford University Press, 2003). She is past president of the Edith Wharton Society. Currently she is examining constructions of childhood in American literature.

wegener-1-300x225Frederick Wegener, Associate Editor of The Complete Works of Edith Wharton

Volume  5: Critical Writings
Volume 25: The Writing of Fiction

Frederick Wegener is a professor of English at California State University, Long Beach, and a scholar principally of American literature between 1865 and 1940. He served previously on the faculty of Boston University, Brandeis University, and Fordham University. His scholarship on Wharton includes Edith Wharton: The Uncollected Critical Writings (Princeton University Press, 1996; paperback reprint, 1999), which he edited, annotated, and introduced, and numerous articles: “Edith Wharton and the Difficult Writing of The Writing of Fiction” (1995), “Form, ‘Selection,’ and Ideology in Edith Wharton’s Anti-Modernist Aesthetic” (1997), “Edith Wharton on French Colonial Charities for Women” (1998), “‘Rabid Imperialist’: Edith Wharton and the Obligations of Empire in Modern American Fiction” (2000), “Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edith Wharton, and the Divided Heritage of American Literary Feminism” (2000), and “Edith Wharton and Ronald Simmons: Documenting a Pivotal Wartime Friendship” (2002). He has also produced the Penguin Classics edition of Sarah Orne Jewett’s novel A Country Doctor as well as articles on Henry James, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Charles W. Chesnutt, and others. He has served multiple terms as an at-large member of the editorial board of the Edith Wharton Review. He is associate editor of the thirty-volume The Complete Works of Edith Wharton (Oxford University Press, forthcoming).

darkphoto3Donna M. Campbell, Associate Editor of The Complete Works of Edith Wharton

Volume 10: The House of Mirth

Donna Campbell is professor of English at Washington State University, where she has recently held the Buchanan Distinguished Associate Professorship (2007-2010). Her work has focused on Wharton’s relationships to her American contemporaries and to American naturalism. Recent publications include “Edith Wharton and Naturalism,” in Edith Wharton in Context (Cambridge UP, 2012), “Edith Wharton Meets Aquaman: The Glimpses of the Moon and Imperiled Male Culture in Entourage” (Journal of Popular Culture, 2012), and “The Next 150 Years: Wharton Goes Digital” in the Edith Wharton Review, a version of the keynote address she gave at the Edith Wharton in Florence conference in June 2012. In 2011 she received an Everett Helm Visiting Fellowship for “Cinema, Technology, and Modern Visual Culture in the Fiction of Edith Wharton.”  She has been creating digital projects, including designing web sites for The Edith Wharton Society and her American literature sites since 1997. She has worked with MERLOT, the NINES project, and other online projects, and in 2011, 2015, and 2017 she participated in the Digital Humanities Summer Institute. Her second book, which includes several sections on Wharton, is Bitter Tastes: Literary Naturalism and Early Cinema in American Women’s Writing (University of Georgia Press, 2016).

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 1: Poems

 

 

Vol. 2: Short Stories I: 1891-1903  
Edited by Paul Ohler

 

s200_paul.ohler

Credit: Kwantlen University

Paul Ohler  earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in English from the University of British Columbia. His publications include Edith Wharton’s ‘Evolutionary Conception:’ Darwinian Allegory in Her Major Novels (Routledge, 2006), as well as articles in English Studies in Canada, Edith Wharton Review, and America’s Darwin: Darwinian Theory and U.S. Literary Culture (U of Georgia Press, 2014). He is co-associate editor with Sharon Kim of the Edith Wharton Review and serves as Vice-President of the Edith Wharton Society. He teaches 19th and 20th century American literature at Kwantlen Polytechnic University.  

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVol. 3: Short Stories II: 1904-1914

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVol. 4: Short Stories III: 1915-1937
Edited by Susan Elizabeth Sweeney

 

 

 

 

 

 

wegener-1-300x225Volume 5: Critical Writings  
Edited by Frederick Wegener

Frederick Wegener is a professor of English at California State University, Long Beach, and a scholar principally of American literature between 1865 and 1940. He served previously on the faculty of Boston University, Brandeis University, and Fordham University. His scholarship on Wharton includes Edith Wharton: The Uncollected Critical Writings (Princeton University Press, 1996; paperback reprint, 1999), which he edited, annotated, and introduced, and numerous articles: “Edith Wharton and the Difficult Writing of The Writing of Fiction” (1995), “Form, ‘Selection,’ and Ideology in Edith Wharton’s Anti-Modernist Aesthetic” (1997), “Edith Wharton on French Colonial Charities for Women” (1998), “‘Rabid Imperialist’: Edith Wharton and the Obligations of Empire in Modern American Fiction” (2000), “Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edith Wharton, and the Divided Heritage of American Literary Feminism” (2000), and “Edith Wharton and Ronald Simmons: Documenting a Pivotal Wartime Friendship” (2002). He has also produced the Penguin Classics edition of Sarah Orne Jewett’s novel A Country Doctor as well as articles on Henry James, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Charles W. Chesnutt, and others. He has served multiple terms as an at-large member of the editorial board of the Edith Wharton Review. He is associate editor of the thirty-volume The Complete Works of Edith Wharton (Oxford University Press, forthcoming).

 

 

Volume 6: Writings on Architecture, Design, and Gardens
Edited by Emily Orlando

orlando

Credit: Fairfield University

Emily Orlando earned her B.A. in English and French at Saint Anselm College and her Ph.D. in English at the University of Maryland (2002).   She is the author of Edith Wharton and the Visual Arts (Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2008), as well as articles that have appeared in the following peer-reviewed journals and books: American Literary Realism (1870-1910); New Voices on the Harlem Renaissance: Essays on Race, Gender, and Literary Discourse; Memorial Boxes and Guarded Interiors: Edith Wharton and Material Culture; Women’s Studies: An Inter-disciplinary Journal; Edith Wharton’s The Custom of the Country: A Reassessment; and Edith Wharton in Context. In Spring 2015 her article “Irreverent Intimacy: Nella Larsen’s Revisions of Edith Wharton” will appear in Twentieth-Century Literature. Orlando’s essay titled “Edith Wharton and the New Narcissism” is forthcoming from Women’s Studies: An Inter-disciplinary Journal.   She served as co-director of “Edith Wharton in Florence,” the international conference of the Edith Wharton Society (Florence, Italy 6-8 June 2012).  Orlando currently serves as President of the Edith Wharton Society (EWS) and Book Review Editor for The Edith Wharton Review.  With Immediate Past President of the EWS Meredith Goldsmith, Orlando is co-editing a book drawn from the Florence conference titled Edith Wharton and Cosmopolitanism (currently under review).  From Fall 2013 through Fall 2014 she served as Co-Director for the Program in Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies. As part of the January 2014 celebration of Edith Wharton’s birthday, she gave a talk at The Mount (Wharton’s Lenox, Massachusetts home) titled “Fifty Shades of Lily: Wharton, Art, and Popular Culture.”

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 7: Novellas
Edited by Rita Bode

 

 

 

 

foto-balestraVolume 8: The Valley of Decision (1902)
Edited by Gianfresca Balestra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pm

Volume 9: Travel Writings
Edited by Gary Totten

 

 

 

 

 

darkphoto3Volume 10: The House of Mirth (1905)
Edited by Donna M. Campbell

Donna Campbell is professor of English at Washington State University, where she has recently held the Buchanan Distinguished Associate Professorship (2007-2010). Her work has focused on Wharton’s relationships to her American contemporaries and to American naturalism. Recent publications include “Edith Wharton and Naturalism,” in Edith Wharton in Context (Cambridge UP, 2012), “Edith Wharton Meets Aquaman: The Glimpses of the Moon and Imperiled Male Culture in Entourage” (Journal of Popular Culture, 2012), and “The Next 150 Years: Wharton Goes Digital” in the Edith Wharton Review, a version of the keynote address she gave at the Edith Wharton in Florence conference in June 2012. In 2011 she received an Everett Helm Visiting Fellowship for “Cinema, Technology, and Modern Visual Culture in the Fiction of Edith Wharton.”  She has been creating digital projects, including designing web sites for The Edith Wharton Society and her American literature sites since 1997. She has worked with MERLOT, the NINES project, and other online projects, and in 2011, 2015, and 2017 she participated in the Digital Humanities Summer Institute. Her second book, which includes several sections on Wharton, is Bitter Tastes: Literary Naturalism and Early Cinema in American Women’s Writing (University of Georgia Press, 2016).

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 11: The Fruit of the Tree (1907)
Edited by Katherine Joslin

Katherine Joslin is a professor in the Department of English at Western Michigan University. Her books include Edith Wharton and the Making of Fashion in the Becoming Modern Series (University Press of New England, 2009);  Jane Addams, A Writer’s Life (Illinois, 2004; paperback 2009), a literary biography that places the social settlement founder and Nobel Peace Prize laureate in the company of American writers; and Edith Wharton in the Women Writers Series (Macmillan and St. Martin’s, 1991; paperback 1994), a part of the resurgence in Wharton studies (Joslin is a founding member of the Edith Wharton Society). She co-edited Wretched Exotic: Essays on Wharton in Europe (Peter Lang 1993; paperback 1996), a selection of essays from a conference she directed in Paris; and American Feminism (Routledge, 2003), a four-volume collection of source documents from 1848 to 1920.

 

singleyVolume 12: Ethan Frome (1911)
Edited by Carol Singley

Carol J. Singley (Ph.D. Brown University, M.A., B.A. Pennsylvania State University) is a Professor of English and a Fellow at the Center for Children and Childhood Studies. She directs the Undergraduate Liberal Studies Program and co-directs the American Studies Program, which includes an option for interdisciplinary studies of Walt Whitman. She serves on the board of the Walt Whitman Association, which helps to support historic preservation, education, and tourism at Whitman’s home in Camden. She formerly directed the Women’s Studies Program. She is the recipient of grants and fellowships from the New Jersey Council on the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the American Antiquarian Association, and the Center for Critical Analysis of Contemporary Culture.

A scholar of Edith Wharton, Carol Singley is author of a book about religion in Wharton’s fiction, Edith Wharton: Matters of Mind and Spirit (Cambridge University Press, 1995) and editor of three volumes on Wharton: a New Riverside Edition of The Age of Innocence (2001), the Oxford Historical Guide to Edith Wharton (Oxford University Press, 2003) and The House of Mirth Casebook (Oxford University Press, 2003). She is past president of the Edith Wharton Society. Currently she is examining constructions of childhood in American literature.

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 13: The Reef (1912)

 

 

 

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 14: The Custom of the Country (1913)
Edited by Robin Peel

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 15: War Writings: Nonfiction
Edited by Alan Price

 

 

Volume 16: War Writings: Fiction
Edited by Julie Olin-Ammentorp

Julie Olin-Ammentorp_

Credit: Lemoyne University

A graduate of Middlebury College (A.B.) and the University of Michigan (M.A., Ph.D.), Julie Olin-Ammentorp is the author of Edith Wharton’s Writings from the Great War (2004) and of numerous articles on Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, and Henry James. Her current project is Edith Wharton and Willa Cather: Intersections. She is a past president of the Edith Wharton Society and a member of the Board of Governors of the Willa Cather Foundation. She teaches a wide range of topics in American literature.

 

 

Volume 17: Summer (1917)
Edited by Monika Elbert

elbert

Credit: Montclair State University

Monika Elbert is Professor of English, a University Distinguished Scholar, and former Editor of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review. She specializes in 19th-century women writers; American Romanticism, 19th-century American children’s literature; American Gothic. Her recent books include: Romantic Education in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (Routledge, 2014, co-edited and co-intro, and  essay on narratives of disability included); Transnational Gothic: Literary and Social Exchanges in the Long Nineteenth Century (Ashgate,2013, co-ed. and co-intro.,and essay on Gothic Catholicism and American women writers included); Enterprising Youth: Social Values and Acculturation in 19th Century American Children’s Literature (Routledge, 2008, ed., intro. and essay on Alcott included); and Culinary Aesthetics and Practices in 19th-Century American Literature (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009, co-ed. and co-intro., and essay on Hawthorne, food, and nationalism included). Recent work includes essays on Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, Emerson, Alcott, and Julia Ward Howe. Her books in progress or under contract include Hawthorne in Context (Cambridge UP), American Naturalist Gothic (U of Alabama P), and transatlantic views of the hotel in 19th-century life and literature.

Volume 18: The Age of Innocence (1920)
Edited by Pamela Knights

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmPamela Knights is a Senior Lecturer in English and American Literature  in the Department of English Studies at Durham University. She teaches across a wide range of courses in the department, and, over the years, has held particular responsibility for American Fiction and for Children’s Fiction. Having begun her career in secondary schools and sixth form colleges, and having also worked with PGCE students at both primary and secondary levels, she brings to her teaching a range of approaches garnered from over thirty years of experience across different sectors.She has recently become interested, through her work as editor on the new journal, International Research in Children’s Literature (Edinburgh University Press), in practical issues arising from different cultural styles and in how to help developing writers make their research as accessible as possible across these differences. She remains keen on exploring ways of extending the range of approaches, within less flexible, traditional, teaching and learning structures and spaces. – See more at: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/person/dr-pamela-knights#sthash.AznM41Hd.dpuf

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 19: The Glimpses of the Moon (1922)
Edited by Susan Tomlinson

 

Volume 20: Old New York
Edited by Hildegard Hoeller

Hildegard-Hoeller-cropHildegard Hoeller is Professor of English with an appointment in English and Women’s Studies at the Graduate Center, CUNY. Her academic and teaching interests are 19th and 20th Century American literature, with an emphasis on women writers and African-American writers. She specializes in fiction, and she is particularly interested in the sentimental tradition and in the connections between fiction and economic thinking.

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 21: The Writing of Fiction (1925)
Edited by Frederick Wegener

 

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 22: The Mother’s Recompense (1925)
Edited by Melanie Dawson

 

 

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 23: Twilight Sleep (1927)

 

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 24: The Children (1928)
Edited by Jennifer Haytock

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 25: Hudson River Bracketed (1929)
Edited by Margaret Toth

 

 

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 26: The Gods Arrive (1932)
Edited by Amy Blair

 

 

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 27: Life Writings
Edited by Cynthia Davis

 

 

 

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 28: The Buccaneers
Edited by Maureen Montgomery

 

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 29: Translations and Adaptations
Edited by Gianfranca Balestra, Virginia Ricard, and Hildegard Hoeller

 

 

 

 

cropped-screen-shot-2017-07-27-at-9-37-50-pmVolume 30: Unpublished Fiction and Plays
Edited by Donna M. Campbell and Carol Singley

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